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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

Detailed articleAncient Egypt



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Cult centres /
Edfu
Ancient Egyptian: Behdet or Djeba
Greek: Apollonopolis Magna
Other spelling: Idfu



Edfu

Second pylon of the Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt.
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Second pylon of the Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt.

Edfu, Egypt.
One of two Horus statues, placed to protect the inner sections of the temple. Edfu, Egypt.

naos marking the ultimate centre of the temple cult. Edfu, Egypt."> Leading into the holiest of the holy, with a naos marking the ultimate centre of the temple cult. Edfu, Egypt.
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Leading into the holiest of the holy, with a naos marking the ultimate centre of the temple cult.

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Edfu
Falcons
Great Court
Forest of columns
Walls and decorations
Inner sanctuary
Wooden barque
Simple exteriors
Birth House

In Ancient Egyptian Religion, temple dedicated to Horus of the Winged Disc, built over a period of 180 years, starting in 237 and completed in 57 BCE. Still this was not a continuous process, political unrest would a few times stop the building for several decades.
The Temple of Horus is 138 metre long and 67 metre wide, from south to north, and is the most completely preserved temple of Ancient Egypt.
The existing temple was built on the site of a temple some 1200 years older, which ran from east to west.
Reliefs on the walls show the myth where Horus defeated Seth, and it is assumed that rituals reenacting this were performed at Edfu every year.
The temple holds a few places of special interest. First there are the two Horus falcons in front of the hypostyle hall. The falcons, made from black granite, wears the double crown, which symbolizes Upper and Lower Egypt under one kingship. Right at the end of the main axis, in the Horus sanctuary, there is a shrine of the naos-type dating back to King Nectanebo 2, making it the oldest element here, most likely moved from an older temple. In the back, a beautiful barque of Horus is in place, but it is only a replica.
Around the main sanctuary there are chapels to other gods: Min, Osiris, Khonsu, Hathor and Re.
The rich inscriptions on the walls contains a large collection of temple liturgy, but there is also nationalistic propaganda within the religious imagery. The latter was a reflection of the strong sentiments that the foreign Ptolemaic dynasty caused with Egyptians themselves.
The consort of the local Horus, known as Horus Behdet, was Hathor at Dendera. Once every year, Hathor's statue was ritually transported to Edfu by boat, stayed there for some time, before being returned.
Around the temple, important excavations into mounds with remains back to predynastic times of the 4th millennium BE have been undertaken. Further 5 km north, there have even been found the remains of a small 3rd Dynasty step-pyramid, which function is not known.





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By Tore Kjeilen