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Mardin





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Mardin

Mardin, Turkey.
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Mardin, Turkey. Photo: Senol Demir.

Mardin, Turkey.
Mardin, Turkey.

The Deyrul Zafran monastery. Mardin, Turkey.
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The Deyrul Zafran monastery. Photo: Travelling Runes.

The Deyrul Zafran monastery. Mardin, Turkey.
The Deyrul Zafran monastery. Mardin, Turkey.

The Deyrul Zafran monastery. Mardin, Turkey.
Mardin, Turkey.

City in southeastern Turkey with 70,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate), on an elevation of 1,050 metres above sea level. It is the capital of Mardin province with 710,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate).
Mardin is the trade and administrative centre for its region. Local agriculture produce mainly wheat, barley and sesame. Mohair wool is gathered from angora goats and there are small cotton- and woollen-weaving plants. Mardin also benefits from the trade on the east–west routes of southern Anatolia.
Mardin has its own branch line that connects to the IstanbulBaghdad railway. The most important connection to other urban centres are by road. Diyarbakir is 150 km northwest, Sanliurfa 250 km west, Gaziantep 400 km west, Nusaybin and Qamishle, Syria 60 km southeast.
Mardin is dominated by a ruined Roman citadel which was rebuilt in medieval times. The town is most attractive, with the old quarters climbing up the summit on which the citadel rests. crowns the summit of the highland as evidence of Mardin's earlier existence as the Marida (Marde, Maride, Merida) of antiquity. The 11th century Great Mosque and the Sultan Isa Medresesi structure from 1385 are still standing. There are also 11 churches squeezed in between other houses; 8 of these are still in use.
Mardin has a very mixed population, Turks, Arabs and Kurds all represent large groups.

History
3rd century: Many Syrian Christians settle in Mardin.
640: Occupied by Muslim Arabs.
1104: Falls to the Seljuqs.
1394: Conquered by Timur Lenk.
1408: Falls to the Karakoyun Turkmen tribe.
1516: Becomes part of the Ottoman Empire.
1832: A Kurdish rebellion in town destroys many buildings.
1839- 1840: Occupied by Egypt. The occupation would destroy the town's regional importance.
1910's: The Christian population of Mardin is seriously reduced from massacres and forced emigration.




By Tore Kjeilen