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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Cult centres /
Kom Ombo
Ancient Egyptian: Pa-Sebek
Greek: Ombos



Kom Ombo

Kom Ombo: The Temple of Haroeris and Sobek.
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The Temple of Haroeris and Sobek.

Kom Ombo: Hathor and Sobek.
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Hathor and Sobek.

Kom Ombo: Haroeris standing in front of his consort.
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Haroeris standing in front of his consort.

Kom Ombo: The site lies immediately east of the Nile.
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The site lies immediately east of the Nile.

Travel information from
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Kom Ombo

In Ancient Egyptian Religion, town with a unique double temple from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It is about 50 km north of modern Aswan and ancient Yabu (Elephantine).
The temple was dedicated to two deities, Sobek and Haroeris, Horus the elder, a local variant.
From the forecourt, and into the the sacred chambers, the two sections run parallel, one for each god. The only exception to this is a joint altar in the forecourt, reflecting the fellow ownership of the temple. Really, the only part divided by wall are the inner chambers, while all preceding halls are shared.
The building of the temple began by the command of Ptolemy 6 Philometor, in the middle of the 2nd century BCE, and was completed some 50-60 years later. Most decorations would be completed in the 1st century BCE. Outer structures, however, belong to the Roman era.
It has a layout and design with clear similarities with the temples at Dendera and Edfu, but is smaller. Still, its design is very elegant, although its present state does not transmit this well.





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By Tore Kjeilen