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Afyon





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Afyon

Afyon, Turkey.
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Afyon, Turkey.

Afyon, Turkey.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Afyon, Turkey.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

City in central western Turkey with 120,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate) lying along the Akar River at an elevation of 1,030 metres above sea level. It is the capital of Afyon province with 820,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate).
Afyon has its name from its traditional activity, opium-poppy production. Today the agricultural products include wheat, barley, potatoes, sugar beets and livestock. Industries are relatively limited and involved in refining local products. The production includes sausages, pastrami, clotted cream, mohair, wool, carpets, cement and marble.
Afyon's setting is most dramatic, dominated by a rock upon which a citadel has been erected. Afyon's old town near the citadel holds some of Turkey's finest examples of Ottoman architecture of half-timbered houses with overhanging upper stories. Also near the citadel lie many old mosques, often in good condition. The most important is the Great Mosque from the 1270's.
Afyon is well connected with other urban centres in central Turkey by rail and road; Usak 150 km west, KŁtahya 100 km north, Eskisehir 150 km north, Ankara 230 km northeast, Konya 220 km southeast and Burdur 200 km south.
Afyon has formerly been known as respectively, Afyonkarahisar, Afyon Karahisar and Karahisar-i Sahip.

History
Known in ancient times as Acroenus.
13th century: Comes under the Seljuq Turks, who named it Karahisar, meaning "Black Fortress".
1428: Becomes part of the Ottoman Empire.
1919- 22: Is heavily destroyed during the Turkish War of Independence. Twice it is occupied by the Greeks, but served in August 1922 as the headquarters of Mustafa Kemal before the decisive battle in the war.




By Tore Kjeilen