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Takrouna



Takrouna
Introduction

1. Sunset

Practicalities




















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TAKROUNA
Overlooking the world
Takrouna, Tunisia

Photo: US Army Africa


Takrouna, Tunisia

Photo: MauronB

Takrouna, Tunisia

Photo: MauronB


Up from the plains peeks the rock on which this small village is situated. While old times made this into a most valuable defensive position, today's villagers are seeking comfort in the newer village lying at the feet of the rock.
Only three families are still holding out up here, and their income is... you! Even if there are hoards of youngsters following you for every step you take, there is no need whatsoever, to feel intimidated by people's attitudes here. They want money, but they stay friendly even after they realise that there is nothing to get from you. The boys from the lower village will tell you to not give any money to those in the original village, and then you know what they boys of the real Takrouna will tell you.
Takrouna's played an important part in World War II, where New Zealand troops fought with heavy losses to make the Germans leave this position. Even today, bullet holes are visible in some buildings.
Standing on the top, there is no problem seeing in all directions. It is clear that the people that built the village, appreciated the view. A couple of houses, a mosque, and a zamwiyya with a green dome, plus a new building that hopefully will be chalked and fitted to the rest of the structure until the next time I visit. When you look in the western direction, you'll see a third part of Takrouna, a larger, almost organic village, that takes up the whole space of a protrusion of the rock. Far away, the mountain of Zaghrouan marks the end of what you can see. To the east, a azur line of the Mediterranean can be spotted.
Few places in Tunisia allows a better sunset, or sunrise, than Takrouna. Here, the views extend for tens of kilometres in all directions. And quickly the landscape melts in saturated colours, before it all vanishes in shadows.
The walk down is the bad side, with only electric lights in the distance I felt blind before reaching the fields below.

Takrouna, Tunisia

Photo: MauronB





By Tore Kjeilen