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Open map of EgyptFlag of EgyptEgypt / Geography /
Toshka Lakes
Other spelling: Tushka



New lakes, Egypt

The view here is more recent than the other two satellite photos. Note the larger lakes. Toshka lakes, Egypt.
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The view here is more recent than the other two satellite photos. Note the larger lakes.

The construction of the canal leading water to the Toshka lakes, Egypt.
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The construction of the canal leading water to the lakes.

Toshka lakes, Egypt.
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Toshka lakes, Egypt.
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Lakes in the Western Desert of Egypt, containing surplus water from the Nile and the Lake Nasser. Water has been let through a wadi in the southern end of the Egyptian part of the Lake Nasser.
The lakes are a central part of Egypt's ambitious New Valley Project, inaugurated in 1997, and as of January 2006 not yet completed.
The lakes are apparently named Toshka only unofficially, conveniently after the wadi (seasonal river valley) off Lake Nasser where their source is formed. There are, as of yet, no individual names for each lake.
The outlet from Lake Nasser was created in 1978, named Sadat Canal, but the surface of Lake Nasser didn't reach it before nearly 20 years later.
The first lake was formed in 1998, and in 2000 water had filled this basin, and 3 more lakes have since then been formed. One of them is small, the other three about the same size.
The first lake lies at 172 metres above sea level, the lowest at 147 metres. A fifth lake has been established at 144 metres but is since 2001 dried up. The lakes contain about 80 billion cubic metres of water. The total surface of the lakes are about 1,150 km².
The lakes are intended to become part of a new water way, arriving at the oases of Paris (travel info in a new window) and Kharga (travel info in a new window).
At the moment no infrastructure, like roads, has been established for anything more than along the wadi from Lake Nasser to the first lake.




By Tore Kjeilen