Bookmark and Share


Saudi Arabia
INTRODUCTION
1. Geography
2. Political situation
3. Economy
a. Figures
4. Health
5. Education
a. Universities
6. Media
7. Demographics
8. Religions
a. Freedom
9. Peoples
10. Languages
11. History
12. Cities and Towns



























Open the online Arabic language course






Index / Peoples
Open map of Saudi ArabiaFlag of Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia /
Peoples



Ethnic groups
Figures in 1000.
Arabs
21,700 87.0%
Najdis
10,200 41.0%
Hijazis
7,800 31.0%
Bedouins
1,000 4.0%
Other Saudis
1,000 4.0%
Egyptian
400 1.6%
Palestinians
310 1.2%
Lebanese
250 1.0%
Yemenis
250 1.0%
Syrians
120 0.5%
Sudanese
110 0.5%
Omanis
90 0.4%
Other
150 0.6%
Iranians
170 0.7%
Persians
160 0.6%
Balochis
10 <0.1%
Shahara
45 0.2%
Mahra
30 0.1%
Circassians
25 0.1%
Turks
20 0.1%
Asians
2,400 9.6%
Africans
400 1.6%
Europeans
80 0.3%
Americans
50 0.2%
Population
24,900
Updated 2009, but based on 2005 population estimates.

Today 80% of Saudi Arabians live in urban zones. The population is divided into Arabs and Bedouins.
The division lines between the peoples of Saudi Arabia are more cultural than ethnical. There are division between "native" Arabs (56%), other Arabs and Bedouins (27%), while these groups in other Arab countries are counted as one people. "Native" Arabs are the people of central and western Arabia (Najd and Hijaz), while other Arabs are people originating from the fringes of today's Saudi Arabia, as well as immigrants from other Arab countries.
Bedouins are both the people keeping up nomadic lifestyles, and those with close origin to ancestors living as nomads. Foreign workers are making up 18%, and consists of "other" Arabs, Africans and Asians, as well as a minor group of Europeans and Americans.
While there are some Shi'is living in the east of the country (about 15%) Saudi Arabia is principally Sunni Muslim, keeping up the Hanbali school of Sharia, as this was understood by the Wahhabis, the religiously dominant group of central Arabia from the 18th century, but which today is no longer a force. A clear majority of the foreign workers are also Muslims, coming from Asia and other Arab countries.




By Tore Kjeilen