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Libya
INTRODUCTION
1. Geography
2. Political situation
3. Economy
a. Figures
4. Health
5. Education
a. Universities
6. Demographics
7. Religions
a. Freedom
8. Peoples
9. Languages
10. History
11. Cities and Towns



























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Index / Peoples
Open map of LibyaFlag of LibyaLibya /
Peoples



Ethnic groups
Figures in 1000.
Nationals
4,570 69.0%
Arabs
3,350 57.0%
Libyans
3,350 57.0%
Berbers
1,100 19.0%
Sanousi
550 9.3%
Fezzan
185 3.1%
Nafusa
155 3.6%
Jalo
43 0.7%
Zuwarah
39 0.6%
Jofra
28 0.5%
Sirte
28 0.5%
Kufra
23 0.4%
Riyah
23 0.4%
Awjilah
4 0.1%
Other
22 0.3%
Doms
33 0.5%
Circassians
25 0.4%
Tuaregs
25 0.4%
Toubou
5 0.1%
Dawada
1 <0.1%
Foreigners
1,730 27.0%
Arabs
1,300 21.0%
Egyptians
490 8.5%
Moroccans
230 4.0%
Sudanese
230 4.0%
Tunisians
155 2.7%
Yemenis
97 1.7%
Palestinians
55 1.0%
Mauritanians
41 0.7%
Indians
74 1.3%
Europeans
65 1.1%
Pakistanis
9 0.2%
Filipinos
7 0.1%
Other
275 4.5%

There is much statistical insecurity for Libya concerning people groups. Crucial data is either under-reported or not reported at all. By combining several of the most renowned sources, LookLex has been able to estimate that 27% of the population are foreigners, where a clear majority are from neighbouring countries. Nationals and foreigners combined, Arabs constitute 78% of the population.
For the natives to Libya, Arabs dominate along the coast, in the larger cities. Berbers dominate in the mountains. As with other North African countries, Berbers and Arabs blend in many cases, a large part of Berbers today speak Arabic. In the Sahara, the ethnic composition becomes little bit more complex, a few peoples form small communities in regions traditionally well-protected by the ocean of desert sand.
Two peoples, historically immigrants, are assimilated into the Libyan society: Doms and Circassians.
Europeans living in Libya are not considered nationals, although some belong to long-lasting communities, this is especially the case with Maltese and Italians.
Africans and Asians are the largest non-Arab groups of foreign workers. Immigrants of India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka dominate.
Foreigners live all over Libya, but predominantly in the cities. With the exceptions of Tunisians, who dominate in the west, and Egyptians, who dominate in the east, foreigners live among each other quite randomly.




By Tore Kjeilen