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Open map of SyriaFlag of SyriaSyria / Cities and Towns /
Deir ez-Zawr
Arabic: dayru z-zawr
Other spellings: Dayr az Zur; Dayr az Zor; Deir ez-Zor; Dayr az Zawr; Deir ez-Zur





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Deir ez-Zawr

Suspension bridge across Euphrates River, Deir ez-Zawr, Syria.
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Suspension bridge across Euphrates river, Deir ez-Zawr, Syria.

The memorial to the Armenians slaughtered in 1915, seen outside the Church of the 40 Martyrs. Deir ez-Zawr, Syria.
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The memorial to the Armenians slaughtered in 1915, seen outside the Church of the 40 Martyrs. Photo: Bill Williams.

City in eastern Syria with 190,000 inhabitants (2005 estimate), on the right bank of the Euphrates River. It is the capital of Deir ez-Zawr province.
The main economic activities of Deir ez-Zawr are oil production and gas production. Traditionally, Deir ez-Zawr has been a trade centre for several transport routes crossing the desert, involving economic exchanges between the Syrian cities Aleppo and Damascus, and Mosul in Iraq.
Deir ez-Zawr has excellent connections with other urban centres, by rail, road and a domestic airport. Qamishli is 200 km north, Raqqa 130 km northwest and Damascus 450 km southwest.
Deir ez-Zawr is an active city, mainly modern. The main landmark is the suspension bridge crossing the Euphrates River.
The university of Deir ez-Zawr was founded in 1977. The city also has a first class archaeological museum, opened in 1996.

History
The name of the city is most likely derived from the ancient city of Auzara which was located close to modern Deir ez-Zawr.
1867: Deir ez-Zawr is founded by the Ottomans, with the purpose of controlling the nomads of the Euphrates area.
1918: Occupied by British troops.
1921: Conquered by the troops of Faisal 1.
1924: A suspension bridge (see photo) is built across the Euphrates River.
1941: Occupied by British troops.
1946: Returned to the newly formed independent state of Syria.
1984: Extensive oil fields discovered around Deir ez-Zawr. Facilities are quickly developed.




By Tore Kjeilen