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Ancient Egypt
1. Introduction
2. People
3. Life styles
4. Culture
5. Education and Science
6. Society
7. Economy
8. Government
9. Cities and Villages
10. Language
11. Religion
12. Kings / periods
13. History
14. Map



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Middle Kingdom / 12th Dynasty /
Amenemhet 3
Other spellings: Amenenkhet


Statue of Amenemhet 3. British Museum, London, UK.
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Statue of Amenemhet 3. British Museum, London, UK.

King Amenemhet 3's pyramid at Dahshur, Egypt.
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King Amenemhet 3's pyramid at Dahshur, Egypt.

Remains of King Amenemhet 3's pyramid at Hawara, Egypt
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Remains of King Amenemhet 3's pyramid at Hawara, Egypt.

King of Ancient Egypt 1831-1786 BCE, 45 years, the 6th ruler of the 12th Dynasty.
It is believed that Amenemhet was co-regent with his father, Sesostris 3 for a short period before his death.
Amenemhet's almost 50 years in power was a period of great economic development, prosperity and peace for Egypt.
In the field of administration, his greatest achievement was to defeat the provincial nobility, and thereby secur the control of the central power. Until his time, tensions between provinces and the central government could at times be strong and destructive.
He assured that large irrigation and reclamation schemes begun by earlier rulers were completed. The irregular influx of water in the Fayoum depression just south of Memphis was brought under control, draining much of the marsh areas, reclaiming more than 600 km² of land for agriculture. Fayoum would soon become one of Egypt's greatest food producing regions.
The trading fleet of Egypt reached out to new lands, allowing trade over large parts of the eastern Mediterranean Sea.
Another important development sector was mining. The general output increased greatly during his reign.
He built two pyramids. The one at Dahshur started to collapse before he died, so he had another one built at Hawara, close to Fayoum, the favoured region of his time. Here he was buried. Next to the pyramid was built a mortuary complex referred to as the Labyrinth. The Labyrinth became a great attraction for centuries to come.





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By Tore Kjeilen