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Lessons

1. Hello & Goodbye

2. Counting

3. Meeting people

4. In the hotel

5. In the restaurant

6. Writing Arabic

7. part 2

8. part 3

9. part 4

10. My name is Issam

11. My local coffeeshop

12. Swedish women

13. Alexandria's beaches

14. Fixing cars

15. Islam & Christianity

16. Quit smoking?

17. Mountains of cookies

18. My marriage









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Yes! This is an online course in Arabic. It teaches you basic sentences, how to write, how to count and introduces Arabic grammar. All with sounds! This course will teach you about 400 of the most common words in Arabic.

No! It doesn't cost anything. There are no hidden costs anywhere. Once you finish the very last lesson, we only wish you best of luck, and welcome you back to any other LookLex service.

All lessons are the product of a cooperation between an Arab native and a non-Arab who have managed to learn the language.
We no longer use the compressed audio format from RealPlayer, but have chosen the open mp3-format instead. All sounds files were recently updated, allowing you the clear sounds you need to get the correct understanding of the pronunciation. Just note that Arabic is a language of many variations and dialects. What you get here is the Standard Modern Arabic (MSA) without dialects. It comes quite close to Damascus Arabic.
If you're absolutely fresh to Arabic, you should start on the very beginning, where you will learn basic sentences without having to deal with Arabic writing. Go to Lesson 1.
If you are more ambitious, why not do what is perhaps most fun: learning to write Arabic. It is not hard, some hours study, and you could be writing your first words. Go to first writing lesson, Lesson 6.
If you just want to refresh your knowledge, jump to Lesson 10, in which all sentences are presented in both Arabic writing and transcription. Here you also will have a word list for every lesson to help you advance in your knowledge.
If you want to know more about the structure and history of Arabic, check its article in the Encyclopaedia of the Orient.




By Tore Kjeilen